IEP Meeting Notification

 

Parent /legal guardian or surrogate parent must receive prior notification of eat IEP meeting. This notice must contain the following information:

 

the purpose of the meeting;

the time, the date, and location of the meeting; and

who will be in attendance.

Remember an IEP meeting must be scheduled at a mutuallv agreed time and place.

 

If the parent(s) are unable to attend the IEP meeting, the school division must use other methods to ensure parent participation in the IEP development. This may include individual or conference phone calls. An IEP meeting may be conducted without the student's parents if the school division is unable to convince them that they should attend. However, there must be documentation of attempts to arrange a mutually agreed on time and place.

 

This documentation may include:

 

detailed records of phone calls made or attempted and the results of those calls

copies of correspondences sent to the parents and any responses, and

detailed records of visits made to the parents' home or place of employment and the results of those visits.

Revising the IEP

 

Revisions in the IEP may be needed during the school year for which the IEP is written. These revisions may include changes in the special education and/or related services; changes or additions of goals and objectives; addition or termination of related services; changes or additions of accommodations; and changes in the participation in general (regular and vocational) education activities.

 

To make these revisions an IEP committee must be convened which includes prior notice to the parent/legal guardian or surrogate parent. If the revised IEP results in the partial termination of special education and related services, then written parental consent is required before the partial termination occurs.

EP Components

 

Present Level of Educational Performance

 

The Present Level of Educational Performance is a written statement which describes the student's strengths, weaknesses and learning styles in:

 

academic,

vocational,

social,

behavioral,

perceptual,

physical,

communication, and/or

life skills, as appropriate.

This information should be recent, relevant data from both formal and informal assessments and observations. All data presented should be accompanied by an explanation that clearly indicates the student's current functioning level to all members of the IEP committee. Listing test scores, numerical attainment, age equivalent or simply naming the disability is insufficient. These descriptive statements must be as complete and accurate as possible, for they are the foundation upon which the goals and objectives are built and the needed supplementary aids and services are determined.

 

If formal tests have been administered, give the full name of the test, level(s) and form(s); and date administered. Do not abbreviate. List all subtests, and record percentiles and standard scores, record age and grade equivalent scores only if standard scores and percentiles are nat available. Also, when given a choice, standardized test scores should be computed according to age norms (best practice).

 

These documents are helpful tools in planning and writing for the Present Level of Educational Performance

 

Components of a Present Level of Educational Performance - Diagram, Objectives, and Checklist

 

Student Profile - Student Form

Student Profile - Parent Form

Annual Goal(s)

 

An annual goal(s) is a statement(s) of what a student with a disability can reasonably be expected to accomplish in a years time in a specific area(s). It is written to address an area of weakness identified in the Present Level of Educational Performance. THERE MUST BE A DIRECT CORRELATION BETWEEN THE ANNUAL GOAL(S) AND THE PRESENT LEVEL OF EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE.

 

Annual goals reflect answers to the question: What do we want the student to be able to do in a years time? The goals must reflect knowledge of the student's current functioning in each skill area, the next sequence of skills in that area and some estimate of the student's rate of learning. If the learning rate is underestimated and the student achieves the annual goal(s) earlier, then new goal(s) can be added. Priorities are established in choosing goals based upon the student's physical limitations, age, time left in school, and expectations for the future. Thus the annual goals in the IEP are:

 

stated in terms of measurable, observable behaviors;

inclusive of the major deficit areas identified in the present level of educational performance: communication, behavior, academics, socialization, selfhelp, perceptualmotor, grossmotor, vocational, related services, and transition services;

answers to the questions: Who - will achieve? What - skill or behavior? How - in what manner or at what level? Where - in what setting or under what conditions?

based on the student's present level of functioning;

realistic in terms of the student's physical and cognitive abilities;

prioritized on the basis of the student's age and amount of time left in school; and

prioritized to meet the student's need and to help the student live independently.

NOTE: The goals written should generalize across programs and be written to meet the unique needs of the student. Although there are no regulations regarding the content of IEP goals, they should NOT be written to address specific curriculum or course requirements in general education classes; and they should NOT be written to the specific programs in which the student will participate.

 

Theis document is a helpful tools for perparing and writing the annual goals secion within the IEP:

 

Annual Goals: Objectives and Checklist

Short-Term Objectives

 

Short-term objectives include a number of steps in the sequence of steps moving the student toward each annual goal. These objectives are not as specific as lesson plans, but rather the intermediate steps between the student's present level of educational performance and the related annual goal. The objectives must be stated in behavioral, measurable terms and state what the student will accomplish. Thus the shortterm objectives in an IEP:

 

are based on annual goals relative to the present level of educational performance;

are based on a sequence of skills;

are stated in observable behavioral, measurable terms; and

answer the questions: Who - will achieve? What - skill or behavior? How - in what manner or at what level? Where - in what setting or under what conditions? When - by what time an ending date?.

NOTE: The objectives written should generalize across programs and be written to meet the unique educational needs of the student. Although there are no regulations regarding the content of IEP objectives, they should NOT be written to address specific curriculum or course requirements in general education classes and they should NOT be written to the specific programs in which the student will participate.

 

Evaluation Criterion

 

Evaluation criterion is the level of performance necessary for mastery of a given objective. This can be expressed in percentage of accuracy required, number of times a certain performance is required, etc.

 

Evaluation Frequency (Schedules)

 

Evaluation frequency is the schedule upon which a student is evaluated. It tells how often a student will be evaluated on a given objective. Objectives may be assessed daily, weekly, monthly, or on/by a specific date. The frequency of evaluation for each objective will vary based upon:

 

the nature of the specific objective,

the developmental level of the student, and/or

the student's anticipated rate of growth.

IEP 504 speical education

Evaluation Procedure

 

Evaluation procedure is the manner in which the skill will be assessed. Procedures may include specific tests, teacher-made tests, curriculum materials, interviews, anecdotal records, observations, and student portfolios (academic and vocational).

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